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10 months ago

Smart Learning

Idioms are phrases or expressions that have a figurative meaning different from their literal interpretation. Let's explore three idioms related to animals and understand their meanings in context.

"Straight from the horse's mouth":
This idiom means to receive information directly from a reliable or authoritative source. It originates from the practice of examining a horse's teeth to determine its age or health, as horse owners were considered the most knowledgeable about their animals.
Example Dialogue:
Tom: "I heard there's a surprise party for Sarah next week."
Sarah: "Well, I can confirm that because I heard it straight from the horse's mouth. My sister accidentally let it slip."

"Take the bull by the horns":
This idiom means to confront or deal with a difficult situation or problem directly and assertively, without hesitation. It alludes to the bravery required to grasp the horns of a bull, symbolizing courage and taking control.
Example Dialogue:
Emily: "I've been procrastinating about starting my new project. It seems overwhelming."
Alex: "You need to take the bull by the horns, Emily. Break it down into smaller tasks and tackle them one by one."

"Throw the bull":
This idiom means to engage in boastful or exaggerated talk, often to impress others or to deceive them. It suggests that someone is making false or inflated claims, much like a bull might charge or display aggressive behavior.
Example Dialogue:
Mark: "Did you hear the stories Joe was telling at the party last night?"
Lisa: "Oh yes, he loves to throw the bull and make himself sound more important than he actually is."

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#angielskidlamlodziezy #EnglishLanguage #angielskidlakazdego #angielskionline #angielski #VocabularyBuilding #angielskidladorosłych #LearnEnglish #English #angielskicodziennie
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10 months ago

Smart Learning

Idioms are expressions that have a figurative meaning different from their literal interpretation. Let's explore three idioms related to animals and understand their meanings in context.

"Road hog":
This idiom refers to a driver who takes up too much space on the road, typically by driving inconsiderately and not allowing other vehicles to pass. It compares such a driver to a hog that occupies a large portion of the road.
Example Dialogue:
Tom: "Why is everyone honking at that car ahead?"
Sarah: "The driver is driving so slowly and refusing to let others pass. They're a real road hog."

"Smell a rat":
This idiom means to sense that something is suspicious or not right about a situation or person. It implies detecting a hidden problem or deceitful intentions, much like how rats can give off a distinct odor when they are present.
Example Dialogue:
Emily: "I'm not sure about this business deal. It seems too good to be true."
Alex: "Trust your instincts, Emily. If you smell a rat, it's best to be cautious and investigate further."

"Snake in the grass":
This idiom describes someone who appears harmless or friendly but is secretly treacherous or untrustworthy. It refers to a hidden danger, like a snake concealed in the grass, ready to strike unexpectedly.
Example Dialogue:
Mark: "I used to trust Linda, but she betrayed me when I needed her the most."
Lisa: "It's unfortunate, but sometimes you can't tell who's a snake in the grass until they reveal their true colors."

Remember to check out our website for more https://smart.edu.pl

#angielskidlamlodziezy #EnglishLanguage #angielskidlakazdego #angielskionline #angielski #VocabularyBuilding #angielskidladorosłych #LearnEnglish #English #angielskicodziennie
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10 months ago

Smart Learning

Idioms are expressions that have a figurative meaning different from their literal interpretation. Let's explore three idioms related to animals and understand their meanings in context.

"Monkey around with":
This idiom means to play or fool around with something in a careless or mischievous manner. It suggests engaging in activities without taking them seriously or not handling them responsibly.
Example Dialogue:
Sarah: "Why are you taking so long to fix the computer?"
Tom: "Sorry, I got distracted. I was monkeying around with some new software I downloaded."

"Pig-headed":
This idiom describes someone who is stubborn, obstinate, or unwilling to change their opinion or behavior. It compares the person to a pig, known for its stubbornness.
Example Dialogue:
Emily: "I tried to convince my brother to apologize, but he's so pig-headed. He refuses to admit he's wrong."
Alex: "Some people just find it hard to see things from a different perspective."

"Play possum":
This idiom means to pretend to be asleep, unconscious, or unaware of what is happening, usually in order to avoid confrontation or danger. It alludes to the behavior of possums, who play dead when threatened.
Example Dialogue:
Mark: "Why didn't you respond when I called you earlier?"
Lisa: "Oh, sorry. I was just playing possum to avoid talking to my nosy neighbor. I didn't want to get into another lengthy conversation."

Remember to check out our website for more https://smart.edu.pl

#angielskidlamlodziezy #EnglishLanguage #angielskidlakazdego #angielskionline #angielski #VocabularyBuilding #angielskidladorosłych #LearnEnglish #English #angielskicodziennie
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